All posts tagged: The SEAD Project

AHHA Education: Teaching English is a Community Recycling Endeavor

“Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.” – Nelson Mandela When was the last time you thought to yourself, “I’m so grateful to be able to use and understand English.” If like me, probably never. Well, as Rocket Raccoon put it, not everyone “know talking good like me and you.” The inability to use English severely limits a person’s prospects in many areas of life. Imagine all the great stuff you’d miss out on: something as simple as googling an answer to a vapid question, at worse, and a pressing matter, at best. Forget writing that convoluted love letter to the cute host working at the Thai restaurant at National Harbor. Too specific? Anyhow, life would just be a little bit harder, don’t you think? So yes, English proficiency is an essential skill required to function in our modern world. Unfortunately, not everyone has the opportunity to learn and develop their English skills. Coming from Laos, growing up around the education business with my father owning and operating …

Dear Community: Our Statement Against Supremacy in America

Dear Colleagues and Community: The Southeast Asian Diaspora Project (SEAD) is disheartened and angered by the senseless acts of violence, hatred and bigotry that took the life of Heather Heyer, injured many activists, and uprooted Charlottesville and other communities across the nation. What is more troubling is our failure to address our complacency in being silent on issues like Southeast Asian deportations; the killings of unarmed Black people by police, and rampant hate crimes as a result of our country’s Islamophobia. History has proven to us that communities of color, refugees and those traditionally marginalized and oppressed by White supremacy will continue to be harmed and disenfranchised unless we speak up and take action as organizations and leaders that work directly with our affected communities. When damaging mentalities and manifestos of White supremacy are internalized in our society, our generation pays for it. As an organization founded by and for Southeast Asian diaspora empowerment, we know what discrimination and violence has done to dehumanize each other and hinder our collective progress. We find the rise of …