All posts tagged: Lao American Writers Summit

2017 Lao American Writers Summit Dates Announced

Mark your calendars for Seattle. Washington state has close to 11,568 Laotians and over 2,000 Hmong; making it one of the largest Laotian communities in the states. The National Lao American Writers Summit will be convened at Highline Community College, June 23-24th 2017 (Friday & Saturday). The Fourth National Lao American Writer’s Summit will provide the space to create, mentor and support the next emerging generation of Lao American writers as well as connect them to creative leaders. During the Summit, nationally-renowned Laotian American writers will conduct workshops with participants and give rare live readings and performances together. More details will follow soon, including a website update over at www.laowriters.org. This year is being made possible by a collaboration between POM Foundation, the Lao Community Service Center (http://www.lcsc-wa.org), Highline Community College, and Seattle Lao community members. The Pom Foundation is well-known for their programming skills such as the popular Kinnaly Music and Dance Classes, Lao Cultural Exchange Program, Lao Summer Camp, and FORTE: Summer Camp Talent Show. The Lao Community Service Center (LCSC) is a non-profit …

#BeLaod Creative Highlight: Thongxy Phansopha

For this #TBT, I’m recalling some moments that remain in my mind since gathering in San Diego for our 3rd Lao American Writers Summit. As I perused the inspiring and mesmerizing gallery of over 10 artists who sent in their artwork, I came across a young artist from Fresno named Thongxy Phansopha; who was furiously putting up what looked like a broomstick on the wall. Thongxy showcased two pieces from his “California Dreaming Transplant Series”. We had a quick chat about his pieces, how social justice reflects his work, and growing up Lao American. “It’s not a broomstick, it’s pieces of palm trees. Palm trees aren’t native to NorCal but it’s prevalent in Southeast Asia. While my parents came here as runaway transplants, I’m also here as a transplant on stolen land.”  “The one on the right is called Chasing Waterfalls. Because, TLC. It’s a tribute to my sister. It’s a story about Lao American youth. People who get lost and don’t make it in the American Dream. It’s that moment when you look in …