All posts tagged: Asian American

Staff Favorites: January 2018 – Childhood Heroes (non-relation)

For the new year, we’re starting something new here at Little Laos on the Prairie. Every month, the staff will unveil our favorites for that month’s theme. It gives us a serious chance to let loose a little–and it gives you the opportunity to get to know us a little better! Besides, does asking “What’s your favorite Lao dish” ever get old? We don’t think so because we never tire of hearing about food! This month, in honor of Martin Luther King, Jr. we asked our staff about a non-relative that made a profound difference in their childhood. Who were your heroes growing up, and why? –Saysomphorn Sisavatdy, ssisavatdy@gmail.com ~~ Donna Luangmany: As a child of the 90’s, I grew up with Lip Smackers, YTV (that’s a kid’s channel, for all you non-Canadians), and of course, pop music. The first album I ever owned belonged to the original queen of pop: Mariah Carey. I couldn’t get enough of “Daydream”. When I wasn’t listening to it, the album booklet was permanently in my hands. An avid reader from …

Affirmative Action: Forging Our Own Identity

This is the last part on a series about how data effects Education and Affirmative Action. You can catch up with Part One here and Part Two here. Recap: We’ve discussed our need to be seen as a distinct group from the rest of Asian America and we’ve also highlighted some of the obstacles we’re running into, with regards to our push for personhood. As I noted in the last segment (part 2), creating our own Lao American platform, with a good amount of distance from the rest of Asian America, is not about hostility or division: it’s about priorities. As a less-resourced, less-accommodated ethnic group, we have to prioritize ourselves because the big players in Asian America (typically East Asian American groups) don’t seem to have our community’s concerns within sight. Luckily though, work to prioritize Lao Americans has already begun to take root, being championed by our own community members. Know Your Role I mentioned before that Southeast Asian Americans worked to win Asian American educational data disaggregation in Rhode Island. Lao Americans were part …