All posts filed under: Southeast Asian

Being Laotian Chinese American at the 4th Lao American Writers Summit

As I start writing this, it has been a few weeks since the 4th Lao American Writers Summit has ended. Although I still feel sad that the summit is over, I still feel a strong emotional high from it. Before I begin, I would like to introduce myself. My name is Tommy Shee. I am three-quarters Chinese and one-quarter Laotian, born and raised in Missouri. In order to write a full reflection about LAWS, I wanted to cover all aspects of it, or at least the aspects I found relevant enough to include, such as, but not limited to: before the conference, the conference itself, and thoughts and advice on the summit overall. Starting off, how did I hear about this summit? I heard of this summit from previous attendees when I was looking for ways to meet more Lao people as well as learn more about what it means to be Laotian Chinese American. Unfortunately, the previous attendees I talked to could not make it this year due to work-related reasons. As a result, …

Dear Guru: What’s with the three-headed elephant symbol in Lao America?

This week’s burning cultural question comes in from Twitter: What’s the deal with the three-headed elephant symbol everywhere in Lao America?  Throughout Theravada Buddhist monarchies in Southeast Asia, the king was assumed to possess a high level of karma from previous existences in order to be born into such a high position. It was also thought that the king derived his semi-divine might as he was an incarnation of the Hindu god Indra. According to this mythology, Indra rides on the mythical multi-headed white elephant (sometimes having three or five heads), named Erawan (Airavata in Sanskrit). This elephant became a symbol for the might of the kingdom, known as Lane Xang (a million elephants). It continued as a unified kingdom until the death of Souriyavongsa in 1695, with no legitimate heir. Warring internal factions battled over who would be the next successor and ultimately divided the kingdom into three parts: Luang Prabang, Vientiane, and Champasak. Weakened, all three ultimately fell under Siamese control until French annexation in 1893, which reunified Laos. The symbol of the three-headed elephant continued …