All posts filed under: Nonprofit

Retired Chef Jeannie Sisongkhone Ongkeo Featured on NYC’s “Native Dish”

(Photo: NYC Media) This week’s episode of “Native Dish” (airing Thursday 12/07/2017 at 9:56pm EST, on NYClife, Channel 25) features Jeannie Sisongkham Ongkeo. Not a native New Yorker with access to that channel? Don’t worry, you can also see her in action on their YouTube channel: So, what is “Native Dish”  and who is Jeannie (Sisongkhone) Ongkeo? “Native Dish is an interstitial series celebrating New York City immigrants from all over the world by exploring their authentic cuisines one dish at a time.” It airs on the City of New York’s Official TV Network, NYClife Channel 25, at 26 and 56 minutes after the hour. The makeup of the show is simple. There are no hosts and no foodie stars. Just NYC Immigrants featuring: their food, their culture, using their own words. NYC has long been a mecca for diversity—in people, food, flavors, music, language, culture, and yes, even politics. The saying, “If you can make it here, you can make it anywhere” only glances at the surface of the city. What you must deduct …

Affirmative Action: Separating Lao America from Asian America

This is part one on a series about how data effects Education and Affirmative Action. My fellow Lao Americans, it’s time. It’s time we make our grand exit from the rest of Asian America. Not exactly in a physical sense, and not exactly with hostility, but definitively, and with all deliberate speed. By “leave” I mean it’s time we demand to be represented separately from other Asian American groups across social platforms. Why? Because Asian America is sharply divided along ethnic lines, in both social experiences and access to resources – and this division is working against Lao Americans and other Southeast Asian Americans in favor of other groups. The Great Divide The Asian American division involves many aspects; Southeast Asia Americans are stigmatized by other Asian Americans for having a) darker skin, b) higher poverty rates, c) more “unskilled refugees” in the community, d) a perceived affinity for gang violence, and e) a bunch of other things. Each of these topics is important (and deserves its own blog post), but the main divide that I …