All posts filed under: Human Rights

Dear Guru: What’s the meaning behind these Cuban propaganda art posters that were sent to Laos back in the day?

This week’s burning question comes in via several emails and comments received when we posted our winner of “Best Public Art Display” on Facebook. It featured artwork from Cuba…sent to Laos during the Vietnam War era. What’s the meaning behind these Cuban propaganda art posters that were sent to Laos back in the day? In the aftermath of World War II, the old world order upended and empires fragmented, giving birth to a new era of nationalism and self-determination among the former colonies. Two opposing ideological blocs arose, the First World capitalist NATO countries and the Second World communist Eastern Bloc, competing for global dominance during this Cold War era. Many of the newly independent Third World states (many former colonies of NATO countries) formed their own neutral Non-Aligned Movement (NAM), which sought to maintain good relations with both sides (at least on the surface). Overlapping the broader membership of the Non-Aligned Movement, were other factions working to sway members’ support on various issues, such as the African Union, the Arab League, the Afro-Asian People’s …

Affirmative Action: Opposing Forces

This is part two on a series about how data effects Education and Affirmative Action. Find Part One here. Crafting a New Identity It would be nice if we were already supported by the rest of Asian America in the fight against these biases and erasures that hurt Lao Americans, but our community has been holding its breath for that to happen since 1975. The fight is not as simple as data disaggregation, either. We also must make sure that Lao Americans can be viewed completely separately in all social arenas, to combat common biases that group all Asian American groups into a single narrative. The presence of this single narrative impacts how people read empirical data, even when disaggregated. Disaggregation must entail how we Southeast Asian Americans see ourselves. Our groups can start by distancing our self-identification, business ventures, and even, arts and media from the rest of Asian America. Not in a way that promotes segregation, but in a way that frees us from any reliance on other groups for resources or advocacy. Otherwise, …