All posts filed under: Next Generation

2018 Lao American Poet Spotlight

It’s April!  That means it’s Pi Mai Lao, National Grilled Cheese Sandwich Month, and National Poetry Month! Lactose intolerance kind of dampens our attitude about grilled cheese sandwiches but here at Little Laos on the Prairie we love our poets who’ve been blazing trails across the country, including creators like: Phayvanh Leukhamhan, Souvankham Thammavongsa, Krysada Panusith Phounsiri, Catzie Vilayphonh, Saymoukda Duangphouxay Vongsay, Xaysouvanh Phengphong, and Kongkeo Saycocie. All of them have helped to make the world a much more interesting place with their verse and creativity! Last year we discovered several new poets in the community through events such as the Lao American Writers Summit in Seattle and social media, and we want to take the time out to draw your attention to their work. You might discover a new favorite writer! Alina Amkhavong is a Lao American spoken word artist with roots in Seattle who attended University of Southern California and performed at the Lao American Writers Summit sharing her poem “blossom” with the community. She’s been very positive about embracing her roots and heritage …

Lao Life: Food is the Ultimate Social Experience

It is a blessing to be able to appreciate youth at a young age. It is a blessing to be able to taste good food while your taste buds are still fully functional (assuming you have stellar ones to begin with). I spent my wonderful teen years in Laos; living the life of a poor vagabond, rich in experiences. I knew a life where happiness came from the company of good friends and a table decked with good food. Everything was cheap and simple because we were all broke and bumming off of our parents, anyways.  We were truly happy. In 2017, $10 could feed a group of at least five! We did not have shopping malls filled with brand name shops or the money to spend in “hi-so” (expensive/luxurious) restaurants but we had sunsets on a river’s bend and heaven at a roadside food stall. My friends were an eclectic bunch: from humble farm boys to business owners, from the very young to the very old; my requirements were not age or background specific, …