Author: Bryan Thao Worra

Jai Gai Nyai

Though my heart is a dinosaur And you but a cold meteor,Fly as you will to my atmosphereI’ll return in my own way Perhaps as poultry,Perhaps a gallon of diesel,Some polished paperweight Or mixed in the concrete NakIn a temple for a thousand soulsWho will come back many times Because they couldn’t let go,Without regret.

Dreams and Declarations in Diaspora

This week we’re celebrating Independence Day in the United States; when Americans signed the Declaration of Independence and setting in motion a journey of 242 years so far to be a people, a country of its own in the world. They threw off the shackles of monarchy beginning with the now classic preamble: “When in the Course of human events it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature’s God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation.” Today, two centuries later, so many take that sentence and what follows for granted, and we rarely consider what it means to us personally, and how and why we benefited from such a bold sentiment. That people could be civil, that they would still be a part of civilized society, but …